We have updated our Privacy Policy Please take a moment to review it. By continuing to use this site, you agree to the terms of our updated Privacy Policy.

Paperback / ISBN-13: 9781844083206

Price: £9.99

ON SALE: 1st June 2017

Genre: Fiction & Related Items / Classic Fiction (pre C 1945)

Select a format:

ebook

Disclosure: If you buy products using the retailer buttons above, we may earn a commission from the retailers you visit.

In a Summer Season is one of Elizabeth Taylor’s finest novels in which, in a moving and powerful climax, she reveals love to be the thing it is: beautiful, often funny, and sometimes tragic.

‘You taste of rain’, he said, kissing her. ‘People say I married her for her money’, he thought contentedly, and for the moment was full of the self-respect that loving her had given him.

Kate Heron is a wealthy, charming widow who marries, much to the disapproval of friends and neighbours, a man ten years her junior: the attractive, feckless Dermot. Then comes the return of Kate’s old friend Charles – intelligent, kind and now widowed, with his beautiful young daughter. Kate watches happily as their two families are drawn together, finding his presence reassuringly familiar, but slowly she becomes aware of subtle undercurrents that begin to disturb the calm surface of their friendship. Before long, even she cannot ignore the gathering storm . . .

What's Inside

Read More Read Less

Reviews

‘One of Taylor’s best novels’ Rebecca Abrams, New Statesman
‘It’s smashing …When you’ve finished In a Summer Season, you are totally fired up to read every book that Taylor ever wrote’ Val Hennessy
One of the most underrated novelists of the twentieth century
ANTONIA FRASER
Jane Austen, Elizabeth Taylor, Barbara Pym, Elizabeth Bowen - soul-sisters all
ANNE TYLER
One of Taylor's best novels
NEW STATESMAN
Witty, hilarious, astringent, devastating - her impeccable style can do anything and with seemingly effortless ease
Neel Mukherjee
Her stories remain with one, indelibly, as though they had been some turning point in one's own experience
ELIZABETH BOWEN